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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 252 (some duplicates have been removed)
at 9:00 and a number two tomorrow morning on c-span-3. next up, hearing looking and syria. over 5000 people have died in syria, including 300 children, as protests and violent clashes continued. the united nations human rights council says syria should be investigated by the international criminal court. >> the subcommittee will come to order. as has been well documented, the human rights being -- human rights violations being perpetrated in damascus are horrifying. we have documented some of the rest of calling him widespread human rights abuses witnessed in -- some of the of the most appalling and widespread human rights abuses witnessed in the past decade. abuse, murder, sexual violence, torture, and the abuse and murder of children. witnesses report the torture, abuse and rape of children no more than 15. one military defector stated that he decided to defect after witnessing the shooting of a 2- year-old girl by an officer who affirmed that he did not want her to grow into a demonstrator. the english language does not have words strong enough to adequately condemn the horrifying
, "bbc world news." >> condemning syria posed a bird cracked on. the u.n. demands an end to gross and systematic violations against anti-government protesters. diplomats from iran's embassy in london and drive back in iran. stock markets enjoyed their best week for almost three years. welcome to bbc news, broadcast to our viewers around the globe. coming up later for the, russia's public servants' luxury lifestyle. report on the epidemic of corruption and greed. how modern technology proved this painting was by rembrandt. the top human rights body at the united nations accused syria of gross and systematic violations in the suppression of protesters. a resolution passed by the u.n. human rights council has been described as the toughest of there. it demands the immediate end to the violence, the release of political prisoners, and the suspension of the security forces suspected of abuses. from a symbol, we report. >> a standoff in northwestern syria. at the moment, there is no shooting. "we don't fear your soldiers or your militia." it was similar in other towns. they are calling
with the militia. that is the situation right now. syria is entering the state of civil war. government does not want to surrender, but is quite clear it is not going to go forward either. yemen is the same situation. the government has -- the president has supposedly step down. he is playing games. he will not step down officially until elections are held, but he is not beating as someone who is being a major politick wager in his country. i am not sure how that is going to be bald. there are a lot of questions all around. >> one of the reasons we wanted to invite you back was i think we talked on this program at this table seven or eight months ago, and everyone was so excited about what was going on in egypt at the time, and you said it is not a revolution, it is just the beginning. you take out the top guy, and you are still left with everyone else who surrounded the top guy. you were very cautious at that time. >> what we're seeing now is the next step. because the military was satisfied with having removed the proper diet. they thought they could keep everything else, that the own powe
protests and more deaths in syria. we will not leave until the deal is done. french president nicolas sarkozy and german chancellor angela merkel ahead of europe's crunched summit. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and 4:00 in the afternoon in moscow, where security forces are still patrolling the streets in what appears to be a massive show of force after two days of protests in the wake of the weekend's election, which saw a vastly reduced majority for putin's party. the opposition says he would be out of office altogether were it not for systematic vote rigging. is this the start of a new mass movement? i should just say -- in the last few minutes, we've heard that the former soviet union leader has asked for the results of the election to be annulled. to discuss this with me, a former dissident who was imprisoned by the communists in the 1980's and now works for human rights center memorial. thank you for being with us. you have been a dissident from communist times. do you see anything new in the latest protests? >> [inaudible] another new point is that i think, th
? prime minister maliki, i'd like to ask you the question about syria. why haven't you demanded that assad step down given the slaughter of his people? >> first of all, the prime minister and i discussed syria, and we share the view that when the syrian people are being killed or are unable to express themselves, that's a problem. there's no disagreement there. i have expressed my outrage in how the syrian regime has been operating. i do believe that president assad missed an opportunity to reform his government, chose the path of repression and has continued to engage in repressive tactics so that his credibility, his capacity to regain legitimacy inside syria, i think, is deeply eroded. it's not an easy situation. i expressed to prime minister maliki my recognition that given syria's on iraq's borders, iraq's in a tough neighborhood, that we will consult closely with them as we move forward. but we believe that international pressure, the approach we've taken along with partners around the world to impose tough sanctions and to call on assad to step down, a position that is increasingly
, egypt, libya and yemen and, also, the ongoing events in syria and bahrain. our speakers today are david ottaway to my left, he's a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center and a former cairo bureau chief for "the washington post". we have the bios of the speakers are distributed, so i'll be very brief. david's last paper as part of our occasional paper series was saudi arabia in the shadow of the arab revolt. we have a few copies left. they are outside. we urge you to pick one on your way out. our second speaker is hen ray barkey -- henry bar key, a former fellow at the wilson center, he's professor of international relations at lehigh university, and i just received a copy of his latest book, "iraq: its neighbors and the united states," which he co-edited with phoebe moore and scott levin si. our third speaker is trita parsi. he's the president of the iranian -- the national iranian-american council, a former public policy scholar at the wilson center, and his upcoming book, "a single roll of the dice: obama's diplomacy with iran," will be coming out in the new year, and we have pla
. >> in a and a in a few moments a hearing on u.s. policy toward syria. for each of the commissioners, do you believe that employs, professional staff of the nrc have experienced intimidation, hostile or offensive conduct on behalf of the chairman, by the chairman, anything that would be considered to be intimidating, hostile or offensive by the chairman, any professional staff experience that? vs. >> yes. >> yes. >> yes. >> ladies and gentlemen that is the definition of a. russ: . i hope that we can all agree that is why we voted in the statute. the united nations estimates more than 5000 people have been killed in protests against the government of syrian resident bashar al-assad. up next the house foreign affairs subcommittee hears about these administrations syrian policy from the state department's release coordinator. this is an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] the subcommittee will come to order. i want to wish everyone good morning and i want to welcome all of my colleagues to this hearing on subcommittee on the middle east and south asia. and the chairman. as has been well-document
." >> israeli outrage against ultra-orthodox jews. arab league observers began working in syria. the u.s. accuses damascus of step attacks against its own people at of their arrival. a new outpouring of public grief is expected on the streets of p'yongyang. a very warm welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and our around the world. how this iconic paris cathedral fell in and out of favor and back in again. the giant outdoor escalator transforming lives and one of columbia's poorest neighborhoods. several thousand israelis have demonstrated in the town of beit shemesh to condemn the behavior of old so orthodox jews who want to segregate between the sexes. the behavior of -- the israeli president has said a minority in israel is acting is -- is acting outrageously. >> by early evening, thousands had gathered in beit shemesh angry at the treatment of women by ultra orthodox jews who want greater separation between the sexes. in recent months, many israelis have been shocked of grown men hurl abuse at school girls. their crime, dressing in modestly. >> >> over the weekend, israeli telev
. >> syria holds local lexis -- elections, but in a country racked by violence, many are choosing to boycott instead. >> taking scotland by storm. after arriving from china, it was time for the panda pair of sweetie and sunshine to meet the press. >> welcome to our viewers on p.b.s. in america and around the globe. the troops are coming home, but america is not abandoning the middle east. that was president obama's message today as he stood beside prime minister maliki to mark the end of america's military commitment in iraq. after nine long years, on december 31st, the last american troops stationed there will come home. can america be influential there without having boots on the ground? here is our coverage. >> prime minister maliki asked to come to arlington national cemetery, where many of those thousands of americans who died fight negligence iraq are buried. he and president obama honored the dead. and for mr. obama today, a warning to iraq's powerful, overbearing neighbor, iran. >> we are partnering for regional security. just as iraq has pledged not to interfere in other nations, ot
later? and the violence in syria that the al assad government doesn't want you to see. stand by for some secret reporting behind the front lines. through diet and exercise, alli can help you lose one more by blocking some of the fat you eat. let's fight fat with alli. ♪ britta olsen is my patient. i spend long hours with her checking her heart rate, administering her medication, and just making her comfortable. one night britta told me about a tradition in denmark, "when a person dies," she said, "someone must open the window so the soul can depart." i smiled and squeezed her hand. "not tonight, britta. not tonight." [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. >>> taking. >>> much more coming up on the iowa caucuses, but there's other important news we're watching right now, including overseas, another bloody friday as syria antigovernment protesters take to the streets by the thousands to crackdown by the al assad regime appears to be hardening, even as arab league monitors assess whether syria is upholding a peace agreement. a freelance journalist wa
between turkey and saudi arabia and the stakes in iran of the current government in syria falls apart. this is about 90 minutes. good afternoon. i run the middle east program at the woodrow wilson international center for scholars. welcome to today's meeting and knees or allies in the new middle east -- turkey, iran, and saudi arabia. this meeting is part of an ongoing series of meetings we have had for a whole year since the beginning of the revolution in tunisia, egypt, libya, and yemen and also the ongoing events in syria and bahrain. our speakers today include a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center and former cairo bureau chief for the washington post. we have the biographies of the speakers distributed, so i will be very brief. david's last paper as part of our occasional paper series was saudi arabia in that shadow of the arab revolt. we have a few copies still left. i would urge you to pick one on your way out. our second speaker is a former fellow at the wilson center. he is a professor of international relations at lehigh university. i just received a copy of his lates
maliki stand side by side. >> the war is ended. >> syria hold local elections, but in a country where more than 5000 have reportedly been killed. taking scullin by storm after arriving from china. today was the time for the and a pair of sweet and sunshine to meet the press. -- the panda pair swee and sunshine to meet the press. welcome. the troops are coming home, but america is not abandoning the middle east. that was president obama's message today as he stood by prime minister maliki today. after nine long controversial years, on december 31, the last american troops will leave the country. but can the u.s. be influential without having boots on the ground? >> present! >> prime minister maliki asked to come to arlington national cemetery where thousands of americans who died in iraq are buried. today, they honored the dead. and for mr. obama today, and warning to iraq caused powerful overbearing neighbor iran. >> just as iraq has pledged not to interfere with other nations, other nations must not interfere in iraq. iraq's sovereignty must be respected. >> the prime minister acknow
on hu -- riots as protestors are cracked down on. syria's president denies ordering a crackdown on protesters. >> europe is working to save the euro. >> germany has added its voice to international concern over election fraud in russia. a spokesman for chancellor angela merkel said the way that sunday's parliamentary election was carried out in some places was worrying. protest over russian prime minister vladimir putin's script on power is a gripping major cities. police have been on the streets in full force to quell anti- kremlin demonstrations. >> a large police presence was sent to the square. they were -- protesters were out in force to protest the recent elections. activists have been organizing themselves on social networking sites. moskow's city authority gave the go-ahead for people to protest. tens of thousands could turn out. >> before, people did not protest against electoral fraud so much. i would like to see those in power deal with this discontent head-on. >> the kremlin is getting increasingly nervous. it is showing weakness. that will provoke more street protes
the beginning. but more importantly, syria, where they are now both on the same side, working with the opposition to overthrow the al-assad regime. though not for the same reasons i don't think. in the case of turkey, i think it's more a personal betrayal of pious side of prime minister aired a gun and the promises he made to aired a gun and didn't the field. the saudi's position is really to eliminate uranian influence in syria and assorted kittie vaden for what happened in iraq, where the american invasion created a shiite dominated government tilting towards iran, from which was a major loss in the saudi constellation and thinking about the arab world. so coming here they are in the same i fighting to overthrow the hussein government. and man, in september, turkey decides that it is going to host a nato early warning antimissile system aimed mostly against uranian. ms publicly puts turkey on the saudi arab sunni side of the saudi iranian conflict. i think that's a major turning point in the whole relationship because that is where turkey commit itself militarily to be in on
changes in egypt, syria and the rest of the arab world? good day, i'm andrea mitchell coming to you live today from tel aviv as we broadcast live from israel this comes as a tumultuous time in u.s.-israeli relations. we've seen all of the pressure coming from the white house on israel as recently as this weekend at a crucial conference. the republican candidates are now beginning to weigh in. joining me now here in tel aviv is the opposition leader, tippy lively, head of the founder of the opposition party and also the former foreign minister. thanks for being with us. first of all you heard many of the criticisms, the pressure on israel at this conference. leon panetta and others. saying that israel has to do more to negotiate with the palestinians and that there needs to be a peace process in place before israel even contemplates any kind of military action against iran. >> i would love to make it clear. having an agreement between israel and the palestinians based on two states for two peoples is in the israeli interest. therefore i believe that we need to go back to the damn table. i
. the iran threat reduction act and iran-north korea-syria reform and modernization act and i urge my colleagues to vote yes on both. we know from history that ignoring the threats of leaders, ignoring their building up of capabilities to threaten the rest of the world, is done so at great peril and at great cost. . i urge my colleagues to support this important piece of legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. kucinich: could i ask how much time all parties have remaining? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio has 93/4 minutes. the gentleman from california has six minutes. and the gentlelady from florida has 3 1/2 minutes. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. kucinich: i ask unanimous consent to include in the record an article from "arms control association" which states that the i.a.e.a. board resolution avoided direct censure of iran and did not declare iran to be in noncompliance with its activities. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. my mr. kucinich: my friend from oregon mentioned the question of oil
get a look at the violence syria doesn't want you to see. >>> it is amazing to me how this guy has been shot this many times. i mean, he's superman. i have been shot three times. my fingers have bullet holes. >> did you hear had a? part man, part terminator. shot three times in a robbery. a marine pulls out the bullets with his own hands. and now he's talking about it from his hospital bed on this "american morning." >>> good morning, everyone. it is thursday, december 29. this is "american morning." a lot going on today. let's get right to it. >> that's right. good morning, everybody. glad you are with us. i'm alina cho. up first, dramatic shift in the political landscape with five days to go before the iowa caucuses. just look at this brand-new c cnn/"time" poll. mitt romney on top in iowa now. followed closely by ron paul. newt gingrich plunging and rick santorum suddenly rolling right to the top three. gingrich now 11 points behind romney. he's dropped 19 points in less than a month. after gingrich called on romney, again, to debate one-on-one the following massachusetts govern
by some dark ones a discredited regime is still a of violently clinging to power in syria though the pressure against it is increasing dramatically each day. i want to condemn in the strongest possible terms the assad regime's murder and torture of children that the u.n. reported this week in geneva. , buts conduct --assad's has brought scorn, pressure, and punishing sanctions not just by the united states and europe but now by the arab league and turkey as well. in addition, the continued to drive has developed nuclear capabilities. this includes troubling enrichment activities and past work on what position that has now been documented by the iaea and it's continued support for groups like hezbollah, hamas, and other terrorist organizations, makes clear that tehran is a grave threat to all of us. all of this upheaval is posing new challenges for israel regarding its security and position in the region. in this time of understandable anxiety, i would like to underscore one thing that has stayed constant the past three years of this administration -- the determination of the unit
anyone, so many revolutionary changes among the neighbors. egypt and syria and beyond that, what's happening in tunisia and yemen and elsewhere in the region. how does israel address the changing arab world? >> well you're right, andrea. stalemate at home in such contrast with what's happening to the rest of the middle east. look, israel needs now to first of all simply just come to terms with what's happening in the region around it. muslim fundamentalists have won the elections in all of the elections that have been held so far. and of course, in egypt we're still adding up the votes. but it's pretty clear that muslim fundamentalists going on will have a leading role in egypt. of course the egyptian army will have a lot to say about that. but israel now need to assess what's happening around it and then to assess to what extent that has any direct impact on its relations with the palestinians. and especially from the point of view of the urgency of israel reaching some deal with the palestinians. because every change that's happened in the middle east over the last decades has
by anybody inside of iraq. and i believe them. >> now, syria is also another concern. the iraqi government has not been as forceful in criticizing the violent crack down. the prime minister saying he doesn't believe he has the right it call the president to step down. mr. obama was asked about this. he described their differences as tactical and he said that he believes the prime minister is doing what he thinks is bet for the people of iraq. wolf? >> that's pretty shocking when you think about it, dan. the only countries in the arab league in lebanon, which obviously hezbollah has close ties with syria and iraq, all of the other members basically are with the u.s. europeans, rest of the world, in condemning him. but malachi in baghdad refusing to do so. we will discuss what is going on in our next hour. also, i write about this on my blog today. >>> let's go to jack cafferty right now. he's got the cafferty file. jack? >> not exactly breaking news, but americans are fed up with congress. really, really fed up. a new gal yum poll shows incumbents are highest they have been in years. 76% p
, very worried about iraq. nuri al-maliki's government support for bashara al-assad in syria. lebanon is the only country that refuses to go along with the rest of the arab world, arab league in condemning and impositions sanctions for what it's doing against peaceful protesters throughout the country. these are very worrying signs and a lot of officials and outside experts are very worried about where this direction, where this iraqi government is going. we'll hear some reassuring words, i'm sure, from nuri al-maliki in this joint news conference with the president, but what he says will be significant. what he does in the coming weeks and months will obviously be so much more important. >> wolf, we'll get to you in a minute. i want to bring in arla who's out of baghdad. he talks about nuri al-maliki and this becoming more of a stable place, at least that's what the prime minister has said. what is life like for the iraqis now? >> reporter: suzanne, it's utterly heart breaking and incredibly difficult. iraqis, especially those in the capital baghdad hardly have a normal life. for the
arrive in syria. these are monitors from the arab league who are now being urged to go to a city where there are new reports of a bloody government crackdown on civilians, at least 20 people killed. the nation's capital, ca maas da damascus, is reeling from coordinated bomb blasts. coming up, we'll have a live report from the region. julie: well, you know the loose-knit group of hackers known as anonymous? they have allegedly lifted credit card numbers from a major security firm. the victim is a security think tank, stratfor. the hackers allegedly stole credit card information in a robin hood-inspired stunt, and they charged these people's credit cards and donated it to charity. the web site is currently displaying this "under maintenance" message. this firm has suspended its server and e-mail in response. we're going to have more on this developing story a little later, we'll be talking to an expert here on the show, so stay tuned to that. rick: all right, looking forward to that. a nuclear saudi arabia, one of its princes hinting that the kingdom may join the nuclear arms race, and b
segregation. observers began working in syria. the u.s. accuses damascus of setting up attacks against its people ahead of their arrival. welcome to bbc news, broadcasting on pbs in america, and around the globe. coming up later, fears mount over a toxic chemical leak in northern australia as a freight train is swept off a bridge in a tropical cyclone. the only way is up. the giant outdoor escalator transforming lives in north columbia's poorest neighborhoods. -- columbia -- colombia's porous neighborhoods. hello and welcome. final preparations are underway for the state funeral of kim jong il, which is due to start soon. north koreans continue public mourning. the body of the leader is expected to be driven through p'yongyang. state television usually features nothing but positive reports on what the regime has been doing. lucy williamson reports from south korea that the broadcasts have taken on an almost supernatural tone. >> north koreans are used to hyperbole in the nightly news, beginning every night with a song about the magical qualities of their leader's birthplace, the hospital h
fight against the government in syria. it's the perfect time to find great deals on the 4g lte devices you love. like the droid bionic by motorola for $199.99. or the pantech breakout for $49.99. our lowest price ever. get the technology you love, on the network you deserve. and for a limited time, get twice the data for the same low price. verizon. you wouldn't want your doctor doing your job. so why are you doing hers? only your doctor can determine if your persistent heartburn is actually something more serious... like acid reflux disease. over time, stomach acid can damage the lining of your esophagus. for many, prescription nexium not only provides 24-hour heartburn relief, but can also help heal acid related erosions in the lining of your esophagus. talk to your doctor about the risk for osteoporosis-related bone fractures and low magnesium levels with long-term use of nexium. possible side effects include headache, diarrhea and abdominal pain. other serious stomach conditions may still exist. let your doctor do her job, and you do yours. ask if nexium is right for you. if you ca
for you on the region. in syria you have called for president assaad to step down over the killings of his people, but prime minister maliki has warned that that could lead to civil war that could destabilize the whole region. do you think they could be speaking of iran's influence in this area. speaking of iran, do you think it will be able to weaken the u.s. intelligence because of information from the drone. prime minister, why haven't you demanded that assaad step down given the slaughter of his people? >> first of all, the prime minister and i discussed syria. we share the view that when the syrian people are being killed, or are unable to express themselves, that is a problem. there's no disagreement there. i have expressed my outrage in how the syrian regime has been operating. i do believe that president assaad missed an opportunity to reform his government. he chose the path of repression and has continued to engage in repressive tactics, so that his credibility, his capacity to regain legitimacy in syria is deeply eroded. it is not an easy situation. i expressed to prime minister
's go to syria where two suicide car bombs ripped through the capitol there. look. these bomgs exploded back to back outside heavily guarded intelligence buildings. the blasts came one day after an arab league team arrived to monitor the government's promise to end its crackdown on protesters. the government blames the bombings on terrorists but opposition sources say the president was behind these attacks. >>> duling demonstrations underway in egypt. the scene in tahrir square, you're seeing there protesters are demanding that the ruling military council transfer power to civilians. they're outraged over this week's brutal crackdown. >>> elsewhere in cairo hundreds of pro-military demonstrators gathered to voice their support for the ruling party. >>> reversal today from north korea north korea as it prepares for the funeral of its dear leader, kim jong il. it says it will accept private condolence delegations from south korea. the two countries technically are still at war. earlier in the week the secretive government announced that it would not accept foreign delegations. kim's funer
questions for you on the region. in syria, you have called for president assad to step down over the killing of his people, but prime minister maliki has warned that assad's removal could lead to a civil war that could destabilize the whole region. i'm wondering if you're worried that iraq could be succumbing to iran's influence on this matter and perhaps helping to protect assad. and speaking of iran, are you concerned that it will be able to weaken america's national security by discovering intelligence from the fallen drone that it captured? prime minister maliki, i'd like to ask you the question about syria. why haven't you demanded that assad step down, given the slaughter of his people? >> first of all, the prime minister and i discussed syria, and we share the view that when the syrian people are being killed or are unable to express themselves, that's a problem. there's no disagreement there. i have expressed my outrage in how the syrian regime has been operating. i do believe that president assad missed an opportunity to reform his government, chose the path of repression, and has c
to syria where the foreign press is banned and more than 5,000 syrians have been killed according to the united nations. the presidents assad had the gol that he wasn't to blame for the violence. he said in an exclusive interview with barbara walters. >> do you think that your forces cracked down too hard? >> they're not my forces. they are forces that belong to the government. i don't own the country. >> but you have -- >> reporter:ictatordictators, disassembling for to see. no doubt who he was running the show in syria. >> he's calling the shots. i think bah shar needs to reach out to the people. >> reporter: assad ignored that advice. what does this all upheaval for the region and for the united states? the big fear has always been that well-organized islamic parties, would emerge as the strongest and turn the arab world turns islamic fundament fundamentali fundamentalism. with the first elections taking place, grassroots experience is paying off. it pains to insist their islam is not at odds with democracy. in egypt the muslim brotherhood did win the biggest bloc in this month
into a $14 million mess. look at that. syria may be send ago message to the world. we'll tell you why their annual war games, that's right, annual war games are raising some serious alarm. i'd race down that hill without a helmet. i took some steep risks in my teens. i'd never ride without one now. and since my doctor prescribed lipitor, i won't go without it for my high cholesterol and my risk of heart attack. why kid myself? diet and exercise weren't lowering my cholesterol enough. now i'm eating healthier, exercising more, taking lipitor. numbers don't lie. my cholesterol's stayed down. lipitor is fda approved to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke in patients who have heart disease or risk factors for heart disease. it's backed by over 19 yes of research. [ femalannouncer ] lipitor is not for everyone, including people with liver problems and women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. you need simple blood tests to check for liver problems. tell your doctor if you are taking other medications, or if you have any muscle pain or weakness. this may be a sign of a
an eye on it. thank you. there is also a new wave of bloodshed in syria to tell you about. hundreds of thousands of protesters flooding the streets there after friday prayers. a live report on that coming up. jamie: plus security is already tight in new york city's times square. you can imagine over a million people expected and revelers ringing in the new year will need a warm coat. we'll tell you what you need wherever you're celebrating. we have your foxcast. that is coming up next. ♪ ♪ [ woman ] ♪ what i want this season ♪ if you'd like to try and guess ♪ ♪ it is something very special ♪ i would readily confess [ dogs barking ] ♪ 'cause all i want this season ♪ ♪ is something from your heart ♪ la da da, la da da [ male announcer ] thinking of others this holiday season, travelers. jamie: countdown, it has begun. the big new year's eve party right around the corner. look at at crossroads of america, times square in new york city. as we said a million people could be crowding the streets saturday night to watch the ball drop and ring in 2012. what will they n
, thank you. jenna: "happening now," escalating violence in syria, we're getting reports that security forces have fired on a funeral procession killing two people, raising today's death toll to at least 28. all of these reports tough to verify, of course, from the outside looking in. leland vittert is live from jerusalem as he takes a look at what's happening in that part of the world. leland? >> reporter: hi, jenna. right now we're looking at a death toll that is now well over 5,000 since these protests began, and there's a feeling that if assad government falls, the new regime in syria would actually be the first western-friendly regime that could come out of the arab spring. that means russia and iran are certainly putting a lot of force behind keeping assad in power, and the stakes here are very high. from mass anti-government protests to running street battles, the fight for syria has entered a new chapter, pitting the well-equipped army against it own people. >> the army is pretty strong. we should not forget that bashar has the spear yorety of -- superiority of using the air fo
about what is going to happen in syria. if we want to counter the iranian studs put effort into putting a good outcome in syria. it would be the biggest blow to the iranians strategically that i can think of. >> i just -- i think it's a very important question that he put forward, and i think that the answer is in constant motion because the region is changing dramatically. therefore the iranian calculations changed dramatically. i think there's no question that the most interesting feeler that the iranians put out was in 2003. when we had smashed iraq in a war that put us on their doorstep. and even that feeler when i talk to people in iran in 2003 who were involved in putting it forward, they said frankly that they didn't have the full approval of the supreme leader, khomeini. so now we your in a totally different situation which iran has to calculate where it stands. i agree very much with the point put forward by the professor menashri that the iranian regime right now is very much interested in its own survival, in the survival of the elite. and if this is seen as a vehicle to help
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 252 (some duplicates have been removed)

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